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English 3111 Composition I (Honors/Fall 1999)

Course Topic * Literacies: Defining the Writer in an Internet Age

Course # 12157; MWF 9:30-10:20; Room 230 UGLC; Dr. Angela Petit

Course Description:

This course will focus on the theme of literacy—what it means to write and be a writer.  Starting from personal definitions of literacy, students will explore how they and others view writing and the writer in contexts such as the university, the workplace, and other communities such as the “new” writing environments linked to the internet and their own computer classroom.  Through class discussions, collaborative learning, readings, and numerous formal and informal writing assignments, students will address topics such as the definitions of “literacy” and the “writer”; the technologies of literacy (pen, paper, ink, computers, the internet, etc.); the links between literacy, the university, and work; assumptions about writing and computers; plagiarism and tracking in increasingly electronic writing classrooms; and literacy’s possible links to freedom, success, censorship, surveillance, and control. 

The following questions will help class members to focus their analysis of these many topics:

  • What does it mean to be a writer?  What does it mean to be literate?  How do we define “writing” and the writer?  How do we define “literacy”?

  • What links exist between literacy and education?  What is the purpose of education, especially the act of learning to read and write?

  • Finally, are so-called “electronic” literacies (for example, the internet, email, chat rooms, computer classrooms, etc.) changing how we view writing and the writer?

These questions and topics make up only a partial list of the possible areas that students can discuss and explore.  Together, students and their professor will change this list to suit their needs as they move through the semester.

NOTE.  Absolutely NO computer experience is required for this course.  Throughout the semester, students will use computers in a comfortable environment with the help of their professor, fellow students, and UGLC technical staff members.

Course Texts:

  • Writing Lives: Exploring Literacy and Community.  Sara Garnes et al.

  • The Everyday Writer.  Andrea Lunsford and Robert Connors.

  • Brave New World.  Aldous Huxley.

  • Neuromancer.  William Gibson.

All texts are available at the UTEP Bookstore.  In addition, copies of Writing Lives and The Everyday Writer are on reserve at the UTEP Library Reserve Desk.  Finally, students can use any edition of Neuromancer and Brave New World.

Course Requirements:

  • Paper 1                                                       22%                             Sept. 20

  • Paper 2                                                       22%                             Oct. 25

  • Paper 3                                                       22%                             Nov. 22

  • Comprehensive Final Exam                          22%                             Dec. 8

  • Class Participation Grade*                           12%

* See attached Statement of Classroom Policies for more details.

NOTE:  I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you reserve the right to ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original percentage of the grade.

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 English 3111 Composition I  (Fall 1997)
Topic: The Contemporary Rhetoric of HIV/AIDS  
MWF 9:30-10:20am; UGLC 234
Dr. Angela Petit (Hudspeth 312; 747-6245)

Welcome to English Composition--with a twist.  As part of the MIE program, you have a unique opportunity to develop your academic writing skills within the context of a course devoted to a topic critically important in biology-related fields: HIV/AIDS.  We will cover the same communication skills that all 3111 courses cover: analyzing audience; developing critical thinking through reading, writing, and discussion; using research tools (interviews, data collection, library, internet, etc.); and planning, organizing, drafting, and revising effective written documents.

However, in this section of 3111, you get a little more.  First, we will explore extensively the computer technologies available to contemporary writers for word processing, visual document design, and internet applications.  If you have never used a computer, do not be intimidated.  This new computer classroom will be a learning experience for us all-including me.  Second, as we address the scientific as well as social implications of HIV/AIDS, we will attempt to come to terms with the rhetoric of this controversial set of issues--i.e., with the language that people use to argue their points and convince others to accept their opinions.  Through intensive analysis of texts, you will learn to articulate your own position on HIV/AIDS, and to "step back" from the crisis and understand how others construct their own positions through language.  Not many students get to study language this closely anymore, and you should find that the rhetorical skills you develop in this class help you with your future writing-related courses.  Finally, you will find that this English course complements your other MIE courses, offering you the rare chance to explore complex HIV/AIDS issues in-depth and from a variety of perspectives.

Course Texts and Materials

  • Don't buy any textbooks for this course yet!!!!

  • 2 computer diskettes (3.5"; IBM or unformatted)

  • optional: dictionary (English/English; Spanish/English); thesaurus; grammar handbook (you can either buy these books or use the ones already in the library or ACES tutorial center)

Course Requirements

  • In-Class Essay #1                                 0%                              Aug. 27

  • Literature Review                                30%                             Sept. 24

  • Rhetorical Analysis                              30%                             Oct. 22

  • Persuasive/Argumentative Paper          33%                             Dec. 5

  • Class Participation and Attendance       7%                               ---------

*  Be aware that this small, interactive course requires your full participation.  Although I can teach you about writing and rhetoric, we will be learning about the language of HIV/AIDS together.  Therefore, you will teach each other as much as I will teach you through traditional lectures and class activities.  For this reason, class participation and attendance are critical and will significantly impact your final course grade.  See the attached Statement of Classroom Policies for more detailed information concerning class participation and attendance.

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English 1311   ·   Composition I

Course # 22366 TR 6-7:20pm  (UGLC Room 232 )

Dr. Angela Petit (avpetit@utep.edu, Hudspeth 312, 747-6245)

Course Topic: The American Dream

What is the American Dream?  Numerous answers have been proposed.  For some, the American Dream means success.  For others, money and power.  Others define this dream as happiness.  Still others might define the American Dream as owning a home, getting married, having a family, going to college, starting a business, or achieving independence.

In this course, we will explore both cultural and personal definitions of the American Dream.  In particular, we will explore how these definitions impact the pursuit of a college degree, including your own choice to attend college this semester.  Hopefully, at the end of the semester, we will all have an increased awareness of the ways that the powerful myth of the American Dream impacts our lives and the lives of those around us.

Course Texts 

  • The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford and Robert Connors (new or used; if you do not want to buy this book, a copy is available at the Library reserve desk)

  • The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald (any edition, new or used)

  • Numerous additional readings on topics such as immigration, education, economics, and social class.  These readings will be available throughout the semester at the Library copy center.

Course Requirements (due dates and points will be announced)

  • 2 in-class essays

  • 3 out-of-class essays

  • 2 objective tests (multiple choice and grammar/proofreading

  • Class participation, daily quizzes, readings, homework assignments, etc*

*see attached Policy Statement for more information about these assignments

Note: I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you reserve the right to ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original number of points.

Course Policies

Policies concerning class participation, attendance, deadlines, etc. are detailed on the Course Policy Statement attached to this page.

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English 3365 Advanced Composition & Rhetoric 

“Classical & Contemporary Rhetorical Theory”

  Course # 12668 Fall 1999 (MWF 10:30-11:20; UGLC, Room 208 )

Dr. Angela Petit (angpetit@utep.edu, Hudspeth 312, 747-6245)

In English 3365, Advanced Composition and Rhetoric, we will examine classical and contemporary theories of “rhetoric” or “argument”—that is, theories that examine the many ways that authors “argue” or use language to convince and persuade their audiences that what they say is valid, trustworthy, and true.  In addition, although we will study general theories of rhetoric or argument, we will also focus heavily on how individuals in your major, minor, or future professional field construct arguments and persuade their audiences.

In this course, therefore, you will have many opportunities both to analyze arguments within and outside of your professional field and to construct and analyze your own written arguments.  You will also have opportunities to share what you learn about language with others in the course and to learn about the rhetorical strategies that they discover.

By the end of the semester, you should have an increased awareness of the important role that rhetoric and argument play in writing, especially the writings in various professional disciplines.  This awareness will better equip you to participate actively in the often lively and chaotic debates that construct the knowledge of any field, including your own.

Texts

  • Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students, Sharon Crowley and Debra Hawhee

  • The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford and Robert Connors

both texts are available at the UTEP Bookstore and at the Library Reserve Desk

Course Requirements

  • Summarizing Arguments                                                           

  • Rhetorical Analysis 1: Analyzing Other Writers’ Arguments                         

  • Rhetorical Analysis 2: Analyzing Your Own Arguments                                  

  • In-Class Presentation                                                      

  • Comprehensive Final Exam                                                       

  • Class Participation Grade *                                                       

* See attached Statement of Classroom Policies for more details.

NOTE:  I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you reserve the right to ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original percentage of the grade. 

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English 3358 / Special Topics in Writing

Topic: Editing Your Writing for Grammar, Punctuation, and Style

Course # 16804 (Tues/Thurs 10:30-11:50am)
Dr. Angela Petit
(Hudspeth 312; 747-6245)
Office Hrs: Tues/Thurs 9-10:15am; 12noon-1:15pm; 4:30-6pm

Welcome to editing—the course that will introduce you to all you’ve ever wanted to know about grammar, punctuation, and style but were afraid to ask (or did not learn in previous classes).

Our course this semester will introduce you to the fundamentals of editing for grammar, punctuation, and style.  We will review the rules for grammar, punctuation, and usage extensively, but don’t be concerned that the semester will consist of an endless and mind-numbing repetition of rules.  Although certain assignments will require you to know and follow specific rules for writing, this course will not present language as a set of hard and fast commandments that have been handed down on stone from above and must be followed at all costs. 

Rather, the course will approach language as the wonderfully fluid, ever-changing, powerful organism that it is.  Specifically, our course will be grounded in the assumption that we language-users do not mimic ready-made rules for writing.  Instead, we construct the knowledge—and editorial expectations—of our communities through our ongoing communication with one another.  This course aims to provide you with a broad framework for understanding this complex process, a framework that you can apply to your writing throughout your life. 

Structure of the Course (i.e., what will we be doing this semester?):

Our course will cover a number of topics.  One aspect of writing that we will study throughout the semester is grammar, punctuation, and usage.  Although class sessions will introduce and cover these rules, you will be asked to review these rules on your own by reading your handbook (The Everyday Writer) and completing numerous online exercises based on these readings.

In addition to reviewing grammar, punctuation, and usage, we’ll examine several other topics this semester.  We’ll start with theories that highlight language’s ability to create meaning or shape knowledge.  Authors like Maxine Hong Kingston, Kenneth Burke, and George Orwell will guide our discussion of this topic, and their theories, as well as our own, will provide a foundation for studying language that we can draw from all semester.

After the first few weeks of class, we’ll shift our focus to three additional areas of language.  The first is “style,” that rather nebulous area of language whose rules depend more on a particular community’s expectations than on formal guidelines.  Our study of style will include analyses of diction, syntax, and form, including, if we have time, information and page design.  We’ll also examine how a particular community’s stylistic preferences create knowledge in that field.

Along with style, we’ll study several  “hot topics” in language, among them non-sexist usage, difference and language, and the “back to basics” and whole language movements, which touch on important issues of how we learn to use language, including the rules of language.  Finally, because this course has been designed with UTEP’s professional writing minors in mind, we’ll also study the practice of “editing,” a professional area that many of our professional writing minors may enter when they graduate.

As you have probably already noticed, our semester is packed.  We will certainly need to work together to cover all this material, and this course will require a commitment from each of us.  However, my hope is that all of you will not only learn a great deal but enjoy the semester.

Course Texts:  

  •  1984, George Orwell (new or used, any edition)

  • The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford, course handbook (required! new or used, second edition)

  • Editing for Writers, Lois Johnson Rew  (optional! talk to me first)

  • Several short, inexpensive readings available at the library copy center

** Do what you can to cut costs—used or borrowed copies of these texts are okay; also, if you do not want to buy the textbooks, copies of 1984 and Editing for Writers will be on reserve in the library, free of charge, 3 hours per check-out time.

Course Requirements (due dates listed on daily schedule, next page):

                                                                                                    Points

·         Short Essay 1 (in-class)                                                          50

3+ handwritten pages; will be written during the

second week of class on an assigned topic

·         Short Essay 2                                                                         100

5-6 typed pages; revision of

the in-class essay or an essay on another topic

·         Longer Essay                                                                         100

7-10 typed pages; topic related to course

·         3 Objective Tests                                                             150 (50 each)

Tests will cover grammar, punctuation, usage, style,

and class readings, notes, and discussions;

tests will also include an editing portion that asks

you to copyedit a specific text

·         2 Class Presentations                                                      50 points (25 each)

Two 30-minute group presentations on a “hot topic” or

area of grammar, punctuation, usage, or style of interest

to the class; you will, in essence, teach for 30 minutes

·         Online Exercises (grammar, punctuation, usage, & style)            50

Series of online exercises created and graded through

our course handbook’s companion website

·         Class Participation (see note below *) 

* Final course grade is based on assignments listed above (500 points) plus an additional Class Participation grade that counts for 10% of the final course grade; see Policy Statement (last page) for more information about this class participation grade.

NOTE:  I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you can ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original number of points.  I will explain in class how this additional work would affect your final course grade.

Daily Class Schedule:

**  This schedule is tentative and will more than likely change throughout the semester.  Major assignments are highlighted with an asterisk (**) and in italics.  Presentation dates are listed.  You and your group will choose your presentation dates later in the semester.

Tuesday, August 28                   Introduction to course

                                                Kenneth Burke’s “Definition of the Human” and

William Carlos Williams’ “Red Wheelbarrow”

                                                Commonly Misspelled/Misused Words

                                                Diagnostic Grammar Quiz

Thursday, August 30                 Theories of Language, Meaning, 

                                                and Knowledge-Making

                                                Maxine Hong Kingston’s “No Name Woman”

                                                Reading:  “Proofreading Chart”, “Sentences,             

                                                Phrases, Clauses, Conjunctions” (handout), and 

                                                Commonly Misspelled Words, Everyday Writer  

                                                (EW), pages 292-293

Quiz: Commonly Misspelled/Misused Words

Tuesday, September 4               Language, Meaning, and Knowledge-Making

                                                Reading and Quiz: George Orwell’s “Politics and the 

                                                English Language”

Thursday, September 6              ** Short Essay 1 (in-class); response to Kingston 

                                                  or Orwell **

Tuesday, September 11              Language, Meaning, and Knowledge-Making

                                                Reading and Quiz:  Orwell’s 1984, chapter 1 

                                                Glossary of Usage, Everyday Writer (EW)

Thursday, September 13            Language, Meaning, and Knowledge-Making

                                                Reading and Quiz: Orwell’s 1984, Chapter 2

                                                EW, Glossary of Usage, pages 303-306

Tuesday, September 18              Language, Meaning, and Knowledge-Making

                                                Reading and Quiz: Orwell’s 1984, Chapter 2

                                                EW, Glossary of Usage, pages 307-310

Thursday, September 20            Language, Meaning, and 

                                                          Knowledge-Making—Wrap-up

                                                Reading and Quiz: Orwell’s 1984, Chapter 3

                                                EW, Other Homonyms, pages 294-296

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Spelling—Confused Words

Tuesday, September 25              ** Objective Test 1 **

Thursday, September 27            Difference and Language (Hot Topic 1)

                                                Reading and Quiz: TS Eliot’s “The Wasteland” and 

                                               EW, pages 267-284;

readings on Standard Written English (SWE), 

non-SWE (library copy center)

GRAMMAR Quiz: Basic Grammar

Tuesday, October 2                   Making Knowledge in the Disciplines, emphasis style

                                                Difference and Language, continued

                                                ** Short Essay 2 due  **

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Commas

Thursday, October 4                  Gender and Language (Hot Topic 2), Sexist Language

                                                Reading, Quiz: “Prescriptive Grammar” and “The Semantic

Derogation of Women” (copy center); review EW

GRAMMAR Quiz: Common Ground, Non-Sexist 

Usage

Tuesday, October 9                   Making Knowledge in the Disciplines, emphasis style

                                                Gender and Language, continued

                                                Reading and Quiz: To be announced (TBA)

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Apostrophes

Thursday, October 11                Language and Education (Hot Topic 3); “How do we 

                                                learn language?”

                                                Possible Topics: Whole Language, “Back to Basics” 

                                                movement; Testing

                                                Reading and Quiz: Malcolm X and additional readings

GRAMMAR Quiz: Comma Splices, Run-On's

Tuesday, October 16                 Making Knowledge in the Disciplines, emphasis style

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Sentence Fragments

Thursday, October 18                Language and Education (Hot Topic 3); “How do we 

                                                police language?”

                                                Possible Topics: English-Only Movement, Bilingual 

                                                Education; Testing

                                                Reading and Quiz: Richard Rodriguez, Hillary King, 

                                                Dorothy Regner, and additional readings (TBA) on 

                                                bilingual educ, English-only movement, testing, etc.

GRAMMAR Quiz: Semicolons and Colons

Tuesday, October 23                 Making Knowledge in the Disciplines, emphasis style

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Subject-Verb Agreement

Thursday, October 25                The Profession of Editing

                                                Reading and Quiz: Editing for Writers, Rew, 1-4

                                                 GRAMMAR Quiz: Modifiers

Tuesday, October 30                 The Profession of Editing

                                                Reading and Quiz: Editing for Writers, Rew, 5-7

GRAMMAR Quiz: Pronouns

Thursday, November 1              **  Objective Test 2  **

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Relative Pronouns

Tuesday, November 6                Presentations—Grammar, Punctuation, Usage, Style

                                                Two groups per day, 30 minutes per group

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Restrictive, Non-Restrictive 

Thursday, November 8              Presentations—Grammar, Punctuation, Usage, Style

                                                Two groups per day, 30 minutes per group

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Twenty Most Common Errors

Tuesday, November 13              Presentations—Grammar, Punctuation, Usage, Style

                                                Two groups per day, 30 minutes per group

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Style—Consistency and 

                                                Completeness Coordination and Subordination

Thursday, November 15             Presentations—Hot Topic (Your Group’s Choice)

Two groups per day, 30 minutes per group

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Style—Parallelism

Tuesday, November 20              OFF; THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

Thursday, November 22             OFF; THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

Tuesday, November 27              Presentations—Hot Topic (Your Group’s Choice)

                                                Two groups per day, 30 minutes per group

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Style—Shifts

Thursday, November 29            Presentations—Hot Topic (Your Group’s Choice)

                                                Two groups per day, 30 minutes per group

                                                Reading and Quiz: TBA

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Style—Conciseness; Variety

Tuesday, December 4                **  Objective Test 3 **

                                                GRAMMAR Quiz: Style (Appropriate, Precise Lang)

Thursday, December 6              Wrap up the course  

Thursday, December 13             Final Exam period

                                                **  Longer Essay due this day (no other final) **

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English 3357   ·   Computers and Writing

Course # 25730 (TR  10:30-11:50am; UGLC Room 234 )

Dr. Angela Petit (avpetit@utep.edu, Hudspeth 312, 747-6245)

This course explores the computer's increasingly significant impact on writing, with special emphasis on how current computer languages and software enhance professional documents.

In this course, students will have opportunities to:  

  • explore contemporary issues related to computers and writing

  • learn how to use current computer software and languages (MS Word, Access, Excel, PowerPoint, Adobe PhotoShop and PageMaker, HTML, JavaScript, Java, and FrontPage)

  • create both printed and online professional documents

Although this course will move quickly through a variety of sometimes challenging topics, no previous computer experience is required for this course.  We will train....

Course Texts

  •   Brave New World, Aldous Huxley (any edition, new or used)

  • The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford and Robert Connors (optional, new or used)

  • additional texts (articles, manuals, etc.) available throughout the semester at the Library copy center

**  if you do not want to buy Brave New World or The Everyday Writer, copies are available at the Library reserve desk

Course Requirements

This course will require you to complete four (4) types of projects—

·        12 Weekly Journals on assigned discussion topics and readings (some of these journals will be posted online on our class listserv or written during real-time class “chats” on ecollege.com)

·        9 Portfolio Projects in which you use your new software skills to produce a small professional document; you can either come to class to produce these projects with help from me and tech support or you can complete these projects on your own

·        2 essays, one short essay (4-5 pages) and one longer essay (6-10 pages); topics will be handed out and discussed in class and through ecollege.com, our listserv, and email

·        1 final Web page project on a topic that interests you (for example, a Web page related to bilingual education, marketing, management, law, professional writing, media and communication, advertising, etc)

Course Calendar

You can earn a total of 600 points for the semester.  Your final course grade will be decided by dividing the number of points you’ve earned by the total points possible (for example, 490/600 equals 81% or a “B” for the course).  The calendar on the following pages lists all course projects, their due dates, and their value in points.  I reserve the right to change this calendar; any changes to this calendar will be announced in class, on our course web page at ecollege.com, and through email and our listserv.  Please read the Course Policies on the third and fourth pages for information about deductions for late work, extensions, and so on.

Course Calendar -- Detailed

Portfolio Projects  (180 total points)

  • MS Excel Project                     Tues, February 6                     20 points

  • MS Access Project                  Tues, February 13                   20 points

  • PowerPoint Project                  Tues, February 20                   20 points

  • PageMaker Project                  Thurs, March 8                        20 points

  • PhotoShop Project                   Thurs, March 29                      20 points

  • Beginning HTML Project          Tues, April 10                         20 points

  • Advanced HTML Project         Tues, April 17                         20 points

  • FrontPage Project                    Tues, April 24                         20 points

  • Java/JavaScript Project             Tues, May 1                           20 points

Essays  (200 total points)

  • Short essay                               Tues, March 6                          100 points

  • Longer essay                            Thurs, April 26                          100 points

Final Web Page Project   (100 total points)

  • Web Page Project                     Mon, May 14                           100 points

For your final project, I will ask you to design and create a Web Page (using HTML and/or FrontPage) on a topic that interests you.  For example, you might create a personal Web page that highlights your background, abilities, and interests.  Or, you might create a Portfolio page that includes links to all your professional documents and projects.  Or, if you plan to teach, you could create an online course for your future students.  Finally, if you are interested in law, you could create a legal resource page on a specific legal topic (consumer rights, liability rights, etc.).  The choice of topic will be yours. 

ADVICE—choose your final Web page topic as soon as possible.  Then, use the 9 smaller Portfolio Projects to design and build parts of your final Web page.  That way, most of your Web page will be thought out and built well before the due date.

Weekly Journals (120 total points) 

·        12 Weekly Journals            due dates TBA             10 pts each (120 total pts)

  Because most of our class time will be taken up by training/practice in computer software, we will have to take the “critical” or discussion portion of our course behind the scenes—into our class listserv, ecollege.com chat rooms, and personal journals. 

Starting Tuesday, January 23rd, I will announce the weekly journal topic in class and also post the topic on ecollege.com, on our listserv, and through email.  Everyone will have until the end of the week to post their entry or send it to me before I grade the entries (for example, the journal assigned January 23rd will be due no later than Monday, January 29).  Journal entries count for 10 points each and cannot be made up if missed. 

Most journal entries will relate in some way to a series of readings that you will purchase at the Library copy center.  These readings and journal entries will enable us to move beyond simply learning software to engaging with issues related to computers and writing.  I will ask you to complete some journal entries privately, on your own computer, and email them to me alone.  However, I will also ask you to post several journal entries either on our course listserv or during announced, online chats through ecollege.com.

Course Policies

In a number of ways, this small, interactive course will be strikingly different from your “traditional” college classes.  Don’t let this difference intimidate you.  The UGLC tech support staff and I will guide you every step of the way through this course.  By the end of the semester, you will know more about how (and why) to use software than you thought possible.  My sincere hope is that you will come out of this class having found the experience not only different from the norm but invigorating and extremely beneficial.

To prepare yourself for the course, read the following guidelines carefully.  These guidelines contain information about the course critical to know if you want to succeed. 

COMMITMENT.  Yes, it is possible to get an “A” or “B” in this course.  The keys to getting an “A” or “B” in this course are CONSISTENCY and COMMITMENT.  The workload in the course is not overwhelming but it is constant and, therefore, intense.  For this reason, to succeed in this course, you must commit to keeping up with all assignments, checking the ecollege.com page and your email daily, and getting to a computer to complete the course projects that require a computer. 

ACCESS TO A COMPUTER.  Much of the work for this course will be completed on computer and online, through the Internet.  For example, several Journal entries will require you to post your responses to our course listserv or during scheduled class “chats” through ecollege.com.  If you do not have easy access to a powerful computer with the software that we’ll be using, then you should come and talk to me immediately.  I can send you to the best computer labs on campus.  Also, if you don’t have access to a powerful computer, you should consider attending every class so that you can use the computers in our classroom.

HOLDING YOUR HAND.  If you are not yet comfortable on computer, do not be intimidated by this course.  The tech support guys and I will hold your hand as you learn to become comfortable on computer.  Some advice—if you are not comfortable on computer, attend the classes.  That way, there will be someone there to help you as you learn.

STOP!  BACK OFF, DR. PETIT!  Because our workload is so fast-paced and intense, if I notice that all of you are starting to crumble under the pressure, I WILL back off and start cutting assignments from the calendar.  Also, if all of you, as a class, come to me and tell me that the pace is too intense, I WILL listen to you and change the calendar.

SELF-PACED WORK AND INFLEXIBLE DEADLINES.  A great deal of the work for this course will be flexible and self-paced.  For example, on many days, attendance will be optional, and you will have the option of completing assignments like the software tutorials, journals, and software Portfolio Projects on your own.  However, the workload for this course is fast-paced.  Therefore, although you will have a lot of flexibility in WHEN and WHERE you do the work, THE DUE DATES LISTED ON THE COURSE CALENDAR ARE NOT FLEXIBLE.  ALL DUE DATES ARE FIRM.  NO EXTENSIONS ARE POSSIBLE.  NO EXCEPTIONS FOR ANY REASON.

10 POINT DEDUCTION FOR LATE WORK.  Again, because our workload is so intense, any journal, Portfolio Project, essay, or final Web page project turned in late receives an automatic 10 point deduction.  No exceptions.  If you do miss a due date, your best bet for making up the lost 10 points is to just keep moving to the next assignment and make up the points there.

PROCRASTINATORS, SLACKERS, BEWARE.  Again, our workload is constant and fast-paced.  Again, the keys to getting an “A” or a “B” in this course are commitment and constancy.  If you tend to be a slacker…..if you tend to procrastinate…..then this course will probably cause you a great deal of trouble.  Just be aware.  The work will be constant but not overwhelming at any one time.  However, if you allow yourself to fall behind in this course, your grade will suffer.  This is not the type of course that you can ignore for two months and then “pull” an “A” or “B” in the end.  If you do procrastinate or slack off, then accept that you probably won’t get the highest grade that you could have earned.

SO, WHY SHOULD I TAKE THIS CLASS?  Whether you are already a computer pro or just learning to use a mouse, my hope is that this class will be one of the most useful that you’ve taken at UTEP.  In addition to the stimulating discussion of computer-related issues, there’s the, uh, economic aspect of computers and writing.  More and more employers in every profession are expecting their employees to know how to use the software that we will cover.  Taking this class can double or even triple your future salary potential (I am not exaggerating).

However, this course’s main benefit will be that it will make you comfortable on computer and with software.  We cannot cover every type of software package out there.  Nevertheless, you will learn so much in this course that you will be able to teach yourself new computer software in the future and identify software packages that are similar to the ones we cover (for example, PowerPoint is a clone of Macromedia Director; PageMaker is a clone of Quark Express and MS Publisher; PhotoShop is a clone of MS Image Composer and PhotoDraw).

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English 3359

Technical and Professional Writing

Dr. Angela Petit avpetit@utep.edu, Hudspeth 312, 747-6245

Course # 12714 (10:30am TR, Liberal Arts 209)

Course #12713 (12noon TR, Liberal Arts 304)

Welcome to English 3359, Technical and Professional Writing.  In this course, you will have chances to:

  • analyze the language that individuals in professional fields use;

  • learn about and practice the types of writing found in professional fields; and

  • investigate issues currently important in professional fields.

In general, this will not be a “service” course in which you simply practice writing the various types or genres of technical or professional writing.  Instead, this course is better understood as a rhetoric or language course.  Certainly, in this course you will learn about and practice writing professional documents.  However, just as important, you will also gain an understanding of how language works in professional fields, including language’s sometimes controversial role in creating knowledge and meaning in professional fields.

To help us study language in professional fields, the following questions will guide us through the semester:

  • What is technical or professional writing?

  • How do professionals in a particular field “make” or create the knowledge of their field?

  • How do these professionals communicate this knowledge, either to other professionals or to non-professionals outside their field?

  • How do professionals in a particular field perceive their place in the world that surrounds them?

By the end of the semester, you should have an increased awareness of the important role that language plays in professional fields, especially your own professional field.   Combined with the practice that you receive in writing professional documents, this awareness will better equip you to participate actively in the lively and chaotic debates that construct knowledge in your field.

Texts

  • Brave New World, Aldous Huxley (any copy, new or used)

  • The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford (new or used)

  • Readings available at the Library Copy Center, basement, UTEP Library

Cutting down your book costs.  Copies of Brave New World and Everyday Writer are available at the UTEP Bookstore; it is okay to buy a used copy or to borrow a copy from a friend or library.  Also, if you do not want to buy these two books, copies of the books are available at the UTEP Library Reserve Desk.

Tentative Course Requirements

As one of the only writing courses that you will take as a junior- or senior-level student, this course has a pretty heavy workload.  You have the chance to earn 1000 total points this semester.  I will explain in class how I will calculate your final course grade using these points. 

Please feel free to speak with me at any point this semester about your work and grades in the course.

                                                             Points                          Due Date

  • In Class Essay                                           50                             September 5

  • Report: Prof Language in Your Field        100                             September 19

  • Visuals Assignment                                    50                             October 1

  • Definition Assignment                                50                              October 10

  • Test 1                                                      100                             October 24

  • Brave New World essay                          150                             October 31

  • Review Paper                                          150                             November 21

  • Test 2                                                      100                             December 5

  • Proposal                                                  150                             December 12

  • Class Participation**                               100

** please read the attached Policy Statement for detailed information about class participation, which counts for 100 points or 10% of your final course grade.  I will explain in class how I calculate the class participation grade.

NOTE:  I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you reserve the right to ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original number of points.

  Please feel free to talk to me if you have any questions about the course or this syllabus.

** Good luck this semester!! **

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English 3359

Technical Writing in the Biological Sciences

Course # 24339 (TR 12-1:20pm; UGLC Room 210 )

Dr. Angela Petit (avpetit@utep.edu, Hudspeth 312, 747-6245)

Welcome to English 3359, Technical Writing, with a twist.  Unlike other Technical Writing courses, this one has been designed specifically for people majoring in biology or biology-related fields.  In this course, you will have opportunities to:

  • practice the types of writing that people in biology-related fields do;

  • analyze the types of language or arguments that individuals in these fields use; and

  • investigate issues currently important to people working in the biological sciences. 

In other words, this course will not be a “service” course in which you simply learn and practice the various genres of technical writing.  Instead, this course is better understood as an argument or rhetoric course—that is, as a course that lets you practice writing technical documents but that also provides you with some understanding of how language works and how language influences the writing that biologists do and the ways that biologists “do” or “perform” biology and science.

By the end of the semester, therefore, you should have an increased awareness of the important role that language plays in the biological sciences.   Combined with the practice that you receive in writing technical documents, this awareness will better equip you to participate actively in the often lively and chaotic debates that construct knowledge in biology-related fields.

Texts:

  • Writing Papers in the Biological Sciences, Victoria E. McMillan (new or used)

  • Brave New World, Aldous Huxley (any copy, new or used)

  • OPTIONAL TEXT: The Everyday Writer, Andrea Lunsford & Robert Connors (new or used)

all 3 texts are available at the UTEP Bookstore; used or borrowed copies are okay; also, if you do not want to buy the texts, copies of all 3 books are on reserve in the library 

Tentative Course Requirements (due dates and points will be announced):

  • 2 Position Papers (one in-class paper and one out-of-class paper)

  • 2 Objective Tests (multiple choice and grammar/proofreading)

  • Definition Assignment

  • Annotated Bibliography and Review Paper (also called Literature Review)

  • Proposal to Funding Agency

  • Class Participation, daily quizzes, homework assignments, etc. (see Policy Statement for more info)

NOTE:  I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you reserve the right to ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original number of points.

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English 3359 / Fall 2001

Technical Writing for Environmental Studies

Course # 13886  (Tues/Thurs 1:30-2:50pm)

Dr. Angela Petit (Hudspeth 312; 747-6245; avpetit@utep.edu)

Office Hours: Tues/Thurs 9-10:15am; 12noon-1:15pm;

4:30-6pm; and by appointment

Welcome to English 3359, Technical Writing for Environmental Studies.  Unlike other technical writing courses, this one has been designed specifically for people with an interest in the environment, including students enrolled in UTEP’s BS in Environmental Science program.  Students not majoring in environmental studies are welcome to take this course with the understanding that all class readings, discussions, and assignments will touch on environmental issues in some way.

In this course, you will have opportunities to:

  • practice the types of writing that people who study the environment do;

  • analyze the language or arguments that individuals who discuss the environment use; and

  • investigate issues currently important to people interested in the environment. 

This course will not be a traditional “service” course in which you simply learn and practice the various genres of technical writing.  Instead, this course is better understood as a “language” course—a course in which you practice writing technical documents but also investigate current environmental issues and the ways that language shapes our study of these issues.

By the end of the semester, you should have an increased awareness of the important role that language plays in our understanding of the environment.   Combined with the practice that you receive in writing technical documents, this awareness will better equip you to participate in the often lively and chaotic debates that construct our knowledge about the natural world.

Course Texts:  

  • Sources: Notable Selections in Environmental Studies, Theodore Goldfarb (new or used)

  • Pocket Keys for Writers, Ann Raimes (new or used)

  • Research and Writing in the Sciences and Technology, Christine Hult (**not yet ordered)

  • Several short, inexpensive readings available at the library copy center

Do what you can to cut costs—used or borrowed copies of these texts are okay; also, if you do not want to buy the textbooks, copies of all 3 textbooks will be on reserve in the library, free of charge, 3 hours per check-out time

Tentative Course Requirements

  • In-Class Position Paper                                                            50 points

  • Out-of-Class Position Paper                                                       100

  • Graphics/Visuals Assignment                                                    50                    

  • Definition Assignment                                                                50

  • Research Methods Assignment                                                  50

  • Review Paper                                                                           100

  • Proposal                                                                                   100

  • Analysis of Research Paper Genre                                              50

  • Group Presentation                                                                     50

  • Class Participation                                                 TBA (10% of final course grade)

  • Objective/Grammar Tests (3 tests)                                             150 (50 each)

NOTE:  I reserve the right to drop an assignment or adjust the points if I find that we are running out of time, cannot find the necessary materials, and so on.  However, if I do drop or alter an assignment, you reserve the right to ask to complete the original assignment independently, for the original number of points.

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English 5312 / Fall 2001

Graduate Technical Writing

Topic: Computer User Documentation

Dr. Angela Petit (Hudspeth 312; 747-6245; avpetit@utep.edu )

Office Hours: Tues/Thurs 9—10:15am; 12noon-1:15pm; 4:30-6pm; and by appointment

  Introduction

What is a “technical” object?  A bridge built by engineers?  A computer?  A piece of paper?  An ink pen?  A toy?  What is “technical writing”?  Instruction manuals and specifications?  Brochures?  Engineering articles?  Grant proposals?  A painting?  What about forms of discourse beyond writing?  Does a presentation before a group or an informal conversation about a technical subject qualify as “technical writing”?

We will, perhaps, never be able to define “technical” and “technical writing” to our satisfaction.  These terms are broad, catch-all phrases that we and others use to draw lines around particular forms of communication, to establish borders that divide “technical” language from other types of discourse.  These borders are tentative, constantly shifting as we ourselves redefine what is “technical.”

Our course this semester will not attempt to define “technical” or “technical writing” definitively.  Instead, I ask you to join me in examining one type of technology and area of communication that many people think of when someone mentions technology or technical writing—computers and user documentation, the countless how-to manuals, specifications, and reports that individuals create or use when they design computers or learn to operate them.

Structure of the Course

As a professional writing instructor, I am firmly committed to giving students as wide a range of experience in technical communication as possible.  This experience will include opportunities to discuss theory related to technology and computers as well as chances to learn computer software and design projects that can be added to a portfolio of professional documents.

Specifically, we’ll start the semester with a variety of scholarly and mainstream articles that discuss the profound impact that technology, especially the computer, has had on people’s daily lives.  Topics that we will address are technology, freedom, progress, and control; computers, diversity, and access; gender and technology; and computers and definitions of text.

Next, we’ll talk about the unusual place of technical writing in English departments, where literature and creative writing—not technical communication or composition—have been privileged.  How did technical writing courses get placed in English departments?  Is this the best home for technical writing?  As we examine technical writing and English departments, we’ll also examine important issues related to developing technical writing curricula and performing research in technical communication.  In addition, we’ll talk about technical writing in the non-academic workplace, the future home of many technical writing students.

Starting in October, we’ll shift our focus away from these more general readings to the topic of computer user documentation and the related areas of design, usability, and information architecture.  Although we will read and discuss scholarly works related to these topics, our primary focus will be on the practical: to plan and create a user documentation project—specifically, a print and online guide for performing an action with a computer.

To support this practical project, we will devote roughly one-third of each class session, sometimes more, to learning the computer software that you will need to complete this portfolio project.  By the end of the semester, each of you should be ready to compose a seminar paper that addresses an important technology issue as well as construct and present to the class a sample of user documentation that teaches some action on the computer.

Course Texts  

  • Brave New World, Aldous Huxley (new or used; any edition)
  • Woman on the Edge of Time, Marge Piercy (new or used; any edition)
  • Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (the polar bear book),                  Rosenfeld and Morville (new or used)
  • Articles available for a small fee at the library copy center

Cut costs in any way that you can—used or borrowed copies of these texts are okay.  Also, you will find both Brave New World and Information Architecture on reserve at the library reserve desk, 3 hours per check out time.

Tentative Course Requirements (due dates listed on daily class schedule)  

                                                                                              Points

  • Position Paper 1 (3-5 pages)                                              25                    

  • Position Paper 2 (6-8 pages)                                              50

  • Seminar Paper (15-20 pages)                                            100

  • Technical Communication Careers Memo                           25

  • Daily Reading Quizzes (12 total; 10 points each)                 120 total

  • Listserv Postings (2 per week; 12 weeks; 10 pts per wk)    120 total

  • Design Test                                                                      50

  • User Manuals Review                                                       25

  • Article Summaries (2 total; 15 pts each)                             30

  • User Documentation Project (print, online, and oral)           100

Course Policies

Full attendance is required, regardless of the topic being covered that night.  If an individual misses class, I expect to be given a reason.  Moreover, if anyone misses class, I will meet with that person to discuss their situation.  Based on that person’s circumstances, I may encourage the individual to drop the course.

Class—and the daily quizzes—start at 6pm exactly.  Some of you will be coming straight from work or other responsibilities and may not have time to eat dinner or grab a snack before class.  I strongly encourage everyone to bring food, drink, and anything else that will make them comfortable during class.  I am bringing my dinner!!  Also, if you have a situation that makes it absolutely impossible for you to get to class at 6pm, I need to talk to you to see if we can accommodate your circumstances.

All assignments (papers, projects, listserv postings, quizzes) are due on the dates listed on the daily schedule or announced in class.  I will announce any changes in due dates in class.  Any assignment handed in late for any reason receives a 10 point deduction.  No exceptions.  If you face an emergency and must skip an assignment or turn it in late, my advice is to keep moving.  Take the deduction and make up the points on the remaining assignments.

Daily Class Schedule (please note due dates of assignments)

August 28   Introduction to Technical Communication

Theories of technology and computers. The discipline of technical communication. Lab—monster.com (tech comm. careers); Word

September 4   Theories of technology and computers, cont.

Magic and Ideology. Readings: Althusser, O’Har, Barnstone, Kitalong (readings available at the library copy center; ask for Petit, English 5312, title “Magic”) . Assignments: Quiz: In-class summary of one reading picked at random; 2 listserv postings (postings due by Monday, September 10). Lab—Word; PowerPoint

  ** Technical Communication Careers Memo due **

September 11   Theories of technology, computers, Text Goes Online

Readings: Gibson, Boal, Borges, Ong, etc (copy center; title “Text Goes Online”) . Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings (postings due by Monday, September 17) . Lab—Publisher/PageMaker

September 18   Technology, Freedom, Control, Progress

Readings: Brave New World, Bentham, Foucault (copy center “Control”). Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings (postings due by Monday, September 24). Lab—HTML

September 25   Technology, Diversity, and Access

Readings: Selfe and Selfe, Ohmann, Padilla, Spender, Rude (copy center “Diversity and Access”) . Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings . Lab—FrontPage

** Position Paper 1 due **

  October 2   Gender, Difference, and Technology

Readings: Woman on the Edge of Time, Koerber, other possible readings (copy center “Gender and Technology”) . Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings . Lab—FrontPage

October 9   Technical Communication, Universities, English Departments

Readings: Harris, Stratton, Miller, Scholes, Riley (copy center “Tech Comm and Universities”). Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings . Lab—Photoshop/ ImageReady and PhotoDraw

October 16   Technical Communication: Performing Research

Discuss paper topics. Readings: To be announced (TBA). Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings. Lab—Photoshop/ImageReady and PhotoDraw

** Position Paper 2 due **

                                                                                                                                           October 23   Technical Communication in the Workplace; Ethics

Readings: Dombrowski, Faber, Maquiladora selections, other selections (copy center “Tech Comm in the Workplace”). Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings. Lab—Open

October 30   User Documentation--Introduction

Readings: TBA. Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings . Lab—Documentation project, begin

** User Manuals Review Due **  

November 6   Information Architecture, Narrative

Readings: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web; Bruner’s “Life as Narrative” and other possible readings (TBA). Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings. Lab—Documentation project

  November 13   Information Architecture, Design

Readings: Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (finish); Design selections (library copy center “Design”). Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings. Lab—Documentation project

** Design Test **

  November 20   NO CLASS; THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

  November 27   Usability, Usability Testing

Readings: TBA. Assignments: Quiz; 2 listserv postings. Lab—Documentation project

December 4   Presentations: Documentation Projects 

** Documentation Projects Due **

December 11   Presentations: Documentation Projects

** Documentation Projects Due **

December 17   Final Seminar Paper due

** Turn in Final Seminar Paper by 12noon **

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Foundations of Rhetorical Theory in the Western Tradition

 

Rhetoric, Truth, Knowledge:

Epistemological Concerns in Rhetorical Studies

 

Note.  Ideally, this is a two-semester course, but can be condensed to one semester, if necessary.  The course surveys the Western rhetorical tradition in a standard chronological format.  However, the course tries to place the problematic emphasis on history in the background by centering the entire course on the ongoing epistemological debate in rhetorical studies: does language merely reflect knowledge (called “truth” in some theoretical systems) or does language create knowledge?

                                      

Guiding Questions

What is the place of language/rhetoric in the world around us?

Does our language create knowledge/truth or merely reflect it?

How do our perceptions of language shape our language practices?

 

 

The Classical Athenian Debate: Rhetoric, Truth, Knowledge

 

Primary Readings: Gorgias, Protagorus, Isocrates, Socrates/Plato (Phaedrus, Gorgias, Socrates’ Defense), Aspasia, Sappho, Aristotle (Rhetoric), Diotima, Lysias (On the Murder of Eratosthenes: A Husband’s Defense), Aristophanes (The Clouds), Aeschylus (Oresteia)

Secondary/Supplemental Readings: Jarratt (Rereading the Sophists; “Toward a Sophistic Historiography”), Neel (Aristotle’s Voice), Murphy, Lunsford (Reclaiming Rhetorica), Lefkowitz & Fant (Women’s Life in Greece and Rome), Williamson (Sappho’s Immortal Daughters), Sutherland & Sutcliffe (The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric), McComiskey (Gorgias and the New Sophistic Rhetoric), R. Enos (Greek Rhetoric Before Aristotle), Gray-Rosendale & Gruber (Alternative Rhetorics: Challenges to the Rhetorical Tradition), Fox Keller (Reflections on Gender and Science), Donawerth (Rhetorical Theory by Women before 1900), Ritchie & Ronald (Available Means: An Anthology of Women’s Rhetoric(s))

 

Rhetoric, Civic Life, Imperial Power: Rhetorical Education in Classical Rome

 

Primary: Cicero (De Oratore, Cataline orations), Quintilian (Institutes of Oratory)

Secondary: Lefkowitz & Fant (Women’s Life in Greece and Rome), other readings

 

Truth, Religion, Emerging Science: Rhetoric and Knowledge in the Medieval Era

 

Primary: Augustine (On Christian Doctrine), Boethius, de Pizan, Aquinas, Alchemists

Secondary: Longo (Spurious Coin), Fox Keller (Reflections on Gender and Science), Donawerth (Rhetorical Theory by Women before 1900), Ritchie & Ronald (Available Means: An Anthology of Women’s Rhetoric(s))

 

Truth, Religion, Emerging Science: Rhetoric and Knowledge in the Renaissance and Early Enlightenment

 

Primary: Ramus, Bacon, Newton, Galileo, Sprat, Descartes

Secondary: Sobel (Galileo’s Daughter), Bazerman, Tebeaux, Fox Keller (Reflections on Gender and Science), Bordo (“The Cartesian Masculinization of Thought”)

 

Self-Evident Truths: Rhetoric and Knowledge in the Enlightenment and Modern Eras

 

Primary: Locke, Hobbes, Hume, Whortley-Montague (“Vaccination”), Campbell, Blair, Wollestonecraft (Vindication)

Secondary: Landes (Women and the Public Sphere in the Age of the French Revolution)

           

Rights, Positivism, Objectivism, Scientific Management: The Nineteenth Century

 

Primary: Taylor, Huxley, Marx, Sojourner Truth (“Ain’t I a Woman?”), Harriet Jacobs (Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl), Douglass (Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass), E. Cady Stanton

Secondary: Longo (Spurious Coin), Mattingly (“Telling Evidence: Rethinking What Counts in Rhetoric”), Sutherland & Sutcliffe (The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric), Johnson (Gender and Rhetorical Space in American Life, 1866-1910), Donawerth (Rhetorical Theory by Women before 1900), Ritchie & Ronald (Available Means: An Anthology of Women’s Rhetoric(s)), other readings TBA

 

Rhetoric as Epistemic/Social/Action: Twentieth-Century Rhetorics

 

Primary: Twentieth-Century and New Rhetorics—Bakhtin, Burke, Richards, Perelman, Weaver, Habermas, RL Scott, Leff

Secondary: Enos & Brown (Professing the New Rhetorics), Foss, Foss, & Trapp (Contemporary Perspectives on Rhetoric), Moran & Ballif (Twentieth-Century Rhetorics and Rhetoricians: Critical Studies and Sources), Lucaites, Condit, & Caudill (Contemporary Rhetorical Theory: A Reader), Kuypers & King (Twentieth-Century Roots of Rhetorical Studies)

 

Primary: The Postmodern/Poststructuralist/Postcolonial Condition: Mid-to-Late Twentieth-Century Rhetorical Theory—Cixous, Pratt, Spivak, Said, Anzaldua, Bhabha, Derrida, Lyotard, Foucault, Haraway, Harding, Kuhn, Bourdieu

Secondary: Lechte (Fifty Key Contemporary Thinkers), Lucaites, Condit, & Caudill (Contemporary Rhetorical Theory: A Reader), Foss, Foss, & Griffin (Feminist Rhetorical Theories), Gray-Rosendale & Gruber (Alternative Rhetorics: Challenges to the Rhetorical Tradition), Lunsford & Ouzgane (JAC 18.1 (1998) special issue, The Postcolonial), Faigley (Fragments of Rationality)

 

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